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Official Records of the Rebellion: Volume Eleven, Chapter 23, Part 1: Peninsular Campaign: Reports

The Document

No.2. Reports of Brig. Gen. John G. Barnard, U. S. Army, Chief Engineer of operations from May 23, 1861, to August 15, 1862.

[p.120: 30th JUNE (Battle of Glendale/ Frayser’s Farm/ White Oak Swamp)]

On the morning of the 30th General Woodbury made a reconnaissance between the Charles City and Long Bridge roads, assisting Generals Kearny and McCall in posting their troops, and I went out on all the different roads, arriving at 12 or 1 p. m. at Malvern Hill. At this time the danger seemed to me that the Quaker road, over which our trains were passing, would be taken in flank by the cross roads which I had observed to exist from near Bulten’s or Warriner’s, striking the Quaker road near Malvern Hill (See Campaign Map No. 3.) 1 did not know what the general arrangement of troops was, nor could I see the commanding general, who was not on the field, but I mentioned the circumstance to General Porter, whose troops held the hill. Later in the day you directed me to post some of the reserve artillery, and I took it to the right and front of Dr. Mellert’s house, facing the débouché from the woods of the dangerous roads of which I speak and through which I had previously penetrated to within a half or three-quarters of a mile of the New Castle road. While I was posting these batteries General Porter joined me and established Morell’s brigade on this line. About this time (perhaps 4 p. m.) the action commenced on the New Castle road. So near to us was it, that a shell (whether from friend or foe could not be known) struck near where we were.

Shortly after the enemy opened upon us with his artillery from the woods which skirted the bottom lands to the left or west of Malvern Hill. A brisk cannonade took place, in which we had the better. The gunboats took part in this, and though there seemed to be indications of force on the Richmond road, our position was found too strong to be assailed from this quarter.

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How to cite this article

Official Records of the Rebellion: Volume Eleven, Chapter 23, Part 1: Peninsular Campaign: Reports, pp.120

web page Rickard, J (20 June 2006), http://www.historyofwar.org/source/acw/officialrecords/vol011chap023part1/00002_16.html


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